Pictured: Patrick Church in his studio wearing hand-painted sweat shirt

Tell me about how you got started 

As a child I was always making things.  Initially I wanted to be a fashion designer; however when I started high school I became really interested in art, especially painting. My high school teacher took me under her wing and really helped me build my knowledge of art and art history. She introduced me to artists that still inspire me now. The rest is really a journey, spiritually, emotionally and creatively. 

Who and what are your sources of inspiration? 

My husband is my biggest inspiration. None of this would be possible without him and my love for him, which fuels my creative process every day. He makes me feel free and alive; he believes in me like no one else believes in me.

Unlike conventional fine arts, garments are your canvases, do you have a process for selecting those pieces? 

I start a collection by thinking of an emotion or feeling I want to evoke and then look for pieces that will help convey that idea the best way. My brain goes a million miles an hour and I am always having new ideas. I am always thinking of the next thing. View Post

matt chu picchu the soho story 5

The streets of Soho are synonymous with New York; the cast iron and the cobble stones capture the urban spirit and perhaps the struggles amongst it. With every glimpse of glamour comes a sense of reality that New Yorkers can’t seem to escape. This particularly speaks to artists, since the city offers boundless inspirations and connections, yet plagues their sleep when rents keep rising. And this is exactly what happened in Soho, the now post-artist era neighborhood. View Post

dia beacon matt chu picchu 3

Visiting Dia:Beacon marked my second time encountering Richard Serra’s Torqued Ellipse series. I distinctively recall the sculptures’ sheer sizes during my first visit at a Chelsea gallery. They towered above us, prompting us to maneuver around the labyrinth pieces of steel. The movement of paths the sculptures paved, fooled our perception of the work, since we were consistently shifting our senses to comprehend the piece by whole. And this time at Dia:Beacon, the strong directional lighting from the warehouse windows gave a new light to the daunting yet mesmerizing installation. View Post