In today’s Lunch Break Chats, I caught up with friend and style blogger Henry Ng (Street Style Poser) and got a glimpse of his fashion perspective. For my style profile make sure to visit Henry’s site.

Describe your personal style. Is there a fashion icon you look up to?

Someone described my style as “casual perfection”, which I like that a lot, even though it doesn’t really paint a clear picture. I tend to gravitate towards clothes or items that are unique, quirky or interesting. I like the idea of taking pieces that’s unusual and different and working them into everyday wear.

As for icons, I love Roisin Murphy’s style. She mixes elegance with quirkiness so effortlessly – it helps that she’s stunning but I think her ability to not take herself seriously presents an opportunity to have fun with fashion.

Tell me about this outfit. How did you come up with it?

I had this idea of an Oriental mafia who’s also very sartorial conscious in a modern day sort of way – you know not necessarily rough and tough, but still dark and mysterious, if that makes sense.

What are some of your wardrobe essentials?

I tend to invest in pieces that are unique or interesting that work with several outfits and won’t become out of style. I’m not sure if these pieces are considered essentials per se, but since I’m not a T-shirt and jeans kind of guy, I feel they’re more important to me than a T-shirt or a pair of jeans since you can easily replace them. View Post

Post-it signs inspired by Union Square (NY) mural post election

I admit I’m a very apolitical person and find it rather difficult to voice my views publicly when in a diverse-opinion setting. However, in the recent political environment, there’s certain issues that by no doubt need correcting and cannot go by as is. With designers showcasing all sorts of Anti-Trump collections from New York to Paris, there comes the question whether fashion, an image driven industry, can truly promote change in such crucial times. And I say that yes it can, but it should also extend beyond simple displays of progressiveness. View Post

It’s that time of the year again when corporate America blows holidays out of proportions, and have us single boys and ladies feeling overwhelmed. So instead of making a gift guide, I’m simply telling you: yes, go buy yourself a flower, because you deserve it (or maybe a bouquet if you’re feeling extravagant). Valentine’s day doesn’t require you to be blessed by naked cherubs for you to give your inner-self recognition. And of course that commitment shouldn’t fade with the withering flowers, but instead should propel you beyond all February 14ths you’ll ever encounter.

-Matt Chu

If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll know that I’ve embarked on a teddy bear journey, documenting as many ways possible to make it a fashionable element. After all, the teddy is an iconic toy that evokes all sorts of cuddly and warm feelings, so why not still make it relevant as full-grown adults? My simple progression was as follows: View Post

In this Lunch Break Chat, we paid a visit to Olivia Yao‘s Jewellery Studio in Taipei and discovered the in’s and out’s of her creative business. 

Why did you decide to launch your eponymous label versus working for an established jewelry brand?

I created a new brand to give it a character that represents my vision and thoughts. As a designer, my job is to create the look according to the main core of the brand, so the consumers of the brand can recognize it-even though it may change from time to time like a real person- but they know it and like it as if they’re seeing an old friend.

What was the hardest and your favorite part when starting your own business?

The hardest part is always the management of people. My favorite part is making jewellery that I like to wear.

Tell me a little about your design process- where do you draw inspirations from and how do you make those dreams and stories, a reality?

I draw shapes whenever I see or think of something beautiful; I collect ideas of mechanic parts that I think may be interesting to jewellery making. When I have enough sources of shapes and ideas, I combine them into a story to make these loose ends become a collection. View Post