matt chu picchu new york public library 2

As a New Yorker, the default perception of monochromatic is all black. It’s the easiest (and laziest) way to look effortlessly cool and chic. I say that this goes for navy as well; its a color engrained in all of our staples such as denim and shirts. Yet we look at them as complementary pieces, not the central attention of our outfits. So this is me defying the unconscious tendency and making it all about that navy. View Post

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Visiting Dia:Beacon marked my second time encountering Richard Serra’s Torqued Ellipse series. I distinctively recall the sculptures’ sheer sizes during my first visit at a Chelsea gallery. They towered above us, prompting us to maneuver around the labyrinth pieces of steel. The movement of paths the sculptures paved, fooled our perception of the work, since we were consistently shifting our senses to comprehend the piece by whole. And this time at Dia:Beacon, the strong directional lighting from the warehouse windows gave a new light to the daunting yet mesmerizing installation. View Post

last of winter matt chu picchu 1

As a short guy, I’ve always dressed quite conservatively to make sure my proportions make me look taller. I realized overtime that this was overly restricting, since I ended up sacrificing my taste in clothes to follow a standard of beauty engrained in one’s DNA. To find a compromise, I’ve learned to balance the pieces so one that flattens me is paired with one that elongates.  View Post

IMG_4038As a business school student, I’ve been to my fair share of networking and professional development events. Till this day, I am fascinated by how corporate culture has stripped away people’s personalities from head to toe, literally. From nylon pencil skirts to standard blue dress shirts, I can’t help but think that I’m already living in a dystopian society. But that doesn’t have to be the case. 
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Growing up, I’d never thought I could wear women’s clothes. I thought women’s fashion was meant to be feminine, and men’s masculine; breaking the dress code meant being less of a guy than I already was. Not so true anymore. In fact, people often compliment on my outfits and are surprised when they hear some pieces are women’s.

It started with the photo shoot above. View Post