matt chu picchu urban oasis in midtown 2

Julia Roberts used one word to describe New York City in Eat, Pray Love: ambition. And that one adjective has become a reality ever since I’ve moved to the city three years ago. From scrambling between school to internship to social gatherings, my schedule rarely has a moment of blank space. And as ambition gets in the way of down time, there is little to no time for urban escapes. That’s exactly how I’ve learned to find an oasis amongst all the frenzy the city encapsulates.  View Post

matt chu picchu navy south seaport

Winter carries a solemn attitude characterized by thoughtfulness and a tinge of moodiness. The naval inspired jacket embodies this spirit due to the battlegrounds’ strategic and destructive nature. Yet there’s something attractive about that sense of discipline, perhaps due to promises of reliability and even victory. So here’s to that grounded affair by repurposing the way we style the naval military jacket. View Post

matt chu picchu new york public library 2

As a New Yorker, the default perception of monochromatic is all black. It’s the easiest (and laziest) way to look effortlessly cool and chic. I say that this goes for navy as well; its a color engrained in all of our staples such as denim and shirts. Yet we look at them as complementary pieces, not the central attention of our outfits. So this is me defying the unconscious tendency and making it all about that navy. View Post

last of winter matt chu picchu 1

As a short guy, I’ve always dressed quite conservatively to make sure my proportions make me look taller. I realized overtime that this was overly restricting, since I ended up sacrificing my taste in clothes to follow a standard of beauty engrained in one’s DNA. To find a compromise, I’ve learned to balance the pieces so one that flattens me is paired with one that elongates.  View Post

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Growing up, I’d never thought I could wear women’s clothes. I thought women’s fashion was meant to be feminine, and men’s masculine; breaking the dress code meant being less of a guy than I already was. Not so true anymore. In fact, people often compliment on my outfits and are surprised when they hear some pieces are women’s.

It started with the photo shoot above. View Post