Top 9 Trends from Spring/Summer 2019

Another season and another trend round-up. Although Riccardo Tisci’s Burberry and Hedi Slimane’s Celine were the most anticipated shows, both designers played it too safe and therefore felt irrelevant to today’s imaginative times. So instead, here are 9 top trends that are fresh and here to stick around next spring summer.

I. The Artist Print

From left to right: Dries Van Noten, Marni and Dolce & Gabbana. Images via Vogue Runway

This seasons it’s all about bringing your kindergarten creativity back into your prints. Forget micro or uniform prints – it’s time to channel our inner artists, be bold and collage contrasting visuals fearlessly. Let your body be a walking canvas and you’ll feel like a piece of art too. Francesco Risso’s Marni is a knockout for this trend.

II. Fishermen Netted Fringe

From left to right: J.W.Anderson, Ports 1961 and Dion Lee

Designers have quiet beach towns on their minds for SS’19. While fringe is never really out of fashion-fashion, the netted fringe this season takes on a more artesanal approach. Resembling fishermen knits, these nets feel down-to-earth, yet very much still statement making. Jonathan and Natasa of Ports 1961 repeatedly iterate these fringes throughout their shows gracefully.

III. The Cristobal Baby Doll

From left to right: Marc Jacobs, Annaliese Griffith-Jones (Parsons MFA) and Valentino

The Cristobal effect isn’t having an impact just on Balenciaga: it’s practically everyone this season. From hyper volumed at Marc Jacobs to minimal grace at Valentino, the baby doll dress is reviving in various forms. Almost like counteracts to practical fashion, these dresses speak innocence and playfulness in a time of extreme PC-ness.

IV. The New Denim

From left to right: Junya Watanabe, Anrealage and Matthew Adams Dolan

Straight fit jeans and trucker jackets? So 2017. The Canadian tuxedo has had it’s in’s and outs throughout fashion history, but it’s set to come back again in updated forms. Think double breasted, peplum or even asymmetric dresses – all in denim. And since it’s a familiar material, nothing is really too wild for your everyday wardrobe.

V. Sea Foam Chantilly

From left to right: Valentino, Maison Margiela and Alberta FerratiĀ 

Mint-green didn’t really happen in 2018 like how Millennial Pink took over well, Millennials. But for this spring, expect toned down mint hues that resemble sea foam. Ever calming and elegant, this color (especially when done in Chantilly lace) will carry you through like a breeze. Standout pieces this season include aquatic creations seen at Margiela and Ferrati.

VI. Issey Pleats!

From left to right: Gucci, Balmain and Valentino

Pleats, Please! Issey’s infamous pleating technique has influenced numerous designers’ vocabulary this season. While nothing new to the Japanese, European houses took on sculptural endeavors that wrapped models’ bodies like statues. That’s fashion magic when technique meets creativity seamlessly.

VII. Chic Sports

From left to right: Prada, Marine Serre and Off-White

While athleisure reigns the streets of New York, designers take inspiration and incorporate sporty elements and elevate them with chic materials and silhouettes. Particularly at Marine Serre, where that elevation also includes upcycling, the athleticism never felt so innovative yet relatable. Comfort may be key, but these designers are saying: style still matters.

VIII. Cold Waists

From left to Right: Marina Moscone, Dion Lee and Alexander McQueen

You know how cold shoulder is really in? Designers are now proposing we take the chilly onto the waist. Dress conservatively up and down, but show that waist off. Slicing off blazer-jumpsuits and A-line coats, this trend will sure send you shivers. Be on the watch out for outstanding pieces from Marina Moscone and Dion Lee.

IX. The Couture Spirit

From left to right: Emilia Wickstead, The Row and Rick Owens

In the age of hype obsessed street culture, the couture spirit feels more relevant than ever. This season, many designers felt inspired by good old-school couture and a reversion to quality time spent on garments. After all, those are things that make fashion special in the first place. While vastly different in creative approaches, the dedication to making well crafted pieces can be seen at The Row and Rick Owens.

-Matt Chu

 

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